Friday, January 29, 2010

Thought

In places where literacy is commonplace, any language may be "understanded of the people" if printed with a paralinear translation.

6 comments:

BillyD said...

In theory. In practice it's not that easy following a religious service using a paralinear translation if you don't know the language.

That said, my parish does use them when we have to, since we tend to include a lot of Latin in our Solmen High Masses (the Gloria and the Sanctus are, more often than not, in Latin).

ex_fide said...

We always print the gloria in Latin, the language in which is it generally sung. It's very patronising to assume your congregation doesn't know enough Latin to get through Mass.....or isn't willing to learn or check out a translation themselves. "Understanded of the people...." Pah!

aaronorear said...

Nice try, Geoff, but you're not getting a Latin mass in the Anglican Church!

Geoff said...

In first year theology classes at camp I was assured by no less than a Prayer Book Society branch president that the Articles were perfectly compatible with celebrations of the Latin liturgy as they take place in our own day.

Michael said...

Nice try, Geoff, but you're not getting a Latin mass in the Anglican Church!

Actually, what Geoff suggests seems to be the idea behind standard Anglican cathedral practice in the UK on occasions when a Latin setting for the ordinary is used. A translation is provided alongside the Latin text and this is deemed to satisfy the requirement that the people understand the language employed.

As the precedent has been set and is very well established, I see no reason why the extent of its implementation cannot be extended.

Michael said...

"Extend" and "extended". Oh, the shame!